Thursday, September 18, 2014
   
Text Size

The Johnstown Breeze Login

             
newflag2012
subscribe2
image image image image
Preserving the Harvest: What do I do with all this produce?

By Edie McSherry/For The Johnstown Breeze

It’s that time of year when the fruits of your labor may be getting a little out of hand as ripened zucchini, tomatoes, cucumbers, apples and more wait to be picked.

Even if you don’t grow your own food, you can take advantage of a wide variety of high quality produce at local farmers’ markets and roadside stands. By preserving the produce in abundance now you can enjoy delicious, locally grown fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

The three main methods of preserving food are freezing, dehydrating and canning. Freezing is an excellent way to preserve the freshness, flavor, texture and nutrients of fruits and vegetables. Freezing slows down enzyme activity and retards growth of microorganisms. Most vegetables will need to be blanched – or briefly cooked – before freezing, to prevent loss of color, flavor and nutrients. The key to successful freezing is to always use airtight containers to prevent freezer burn. Freezing works well for fruits, some vegetables and herbs.

This horse has a name

Local “tree guy” David Starr (red shirt) stands with the family of former Milliken Public Works Director Leroy Martinez. Starr collaborated with local chainsaw artist John Baker to create this mustang sculpture that now is on display in front of Milliken Middle School. The work was officially dedicated recently at an Re-5J School Board meeting. Starr, from Milliken, whose children have graduated from Re-5J schools, said following the flood last year he was contracted to remove an uprooted tree that was leaning against a house. “My eight years of carving ice sculptures enabled me to see this horse in the trunk,” he said. “While carving the horse, a great friend of mine (Martinez) became ill from cancer. He passed away the week I finished this horse, which is named Leroy after his memory. The three main reasons I am donating this horse is to thank the Re-5J School District, to remember a beloved member of our community, Leroy Martinez, and to boost school spirit.” Photo by Emily Goggins

Johnstown Fire celebrates centennial

By Danielle Ross/The Johnstown Breeze

One hundred years ago, Johnstown’s fire department was a collection of residents, a committee of trustees and locals who came together with buckets and ladders to collectively put out the town’s fires.

Today, the Johnstown Fire Protection District has two fire engines, one ladder truck, two brush trucks, one heavy rescue vehicle, two tender trucks and a new ambulance. Fire Chief Ron Bateman said the department couldn’t have become what it is today without maintaining a good relationship with the town of Johnstown and its residents.

“I think it’s very important that we have a good relationship with the town,” he said. “We’re not mutually exclusive. Our fates and our journeys are linked.”

The department will celebrate its 100th anniversary with an open house from noon-4 Saturday at its headquarters, 100 Telep Ave.

Hankins farm will feature corn maze

Hankins farm will feature corn maze

By Danielle Ross/The Johnstown Breeze

Turning a century-old family farm into a public family entertainment location isn’t a project that gets done overnight. After more than a year of planning, paperwork and permits, Hankins Farm is nearing its goal of doing just that. Darren Hankins, son of farm owner Harlan Hankins, said it’s an idea he’s been developing for a couple of years now and that he’s excited to see his hard work come to fruition.

Hankins got permission to proceed with the project Wednesday when the Weld County Commissioners approved a Use by Special Review permit.

Hankins started to apply for the necessary permits last year but didn’t quite finish before the agri-tainment season rolled around. Late September through early November is the best time for the fall activities that Hankins Farm will offer, and Hankins said the planned opening date of the entertainment side of Hankins Farm is Sept. 27.

 

HR_Skyscraper

Polls

It’s Child Passenger Safety Week. Do you always comply with the guidelines?

FREE CONTENT FOR YOU
Look for the (free) content!
free_links

 


Did you know that you can
see Free Links and Free Info,
without a subscription?
free_info



You can also submit
Classified Ads,
submit_classified_ad_free


Service Ads
,
submit_service_ad_free


and Life Events announcements
submit_life_events_form_free


without a subscription, too!

 

free-classifieds180x254

ncreteam

cpa20022005

Who's Online

None

Johnstown Breeze Front Page News

Use caution when clipping coupons

The Johnstown Breeze

Many individuals and families use the Internet to find coupons that will save them money at their favorite retailers. The cumulative effect is a savings of $1 billion annually, according to the Coupon Information Corporation.

With the digitized age, however, coupons are subject to misuse and fraud. With that in mind, your BBB advises the following:

Check out who is offering the coupon. If the coupon is offered by a third party such as a partner or affiliate, use caution. Third parties may ask for additional information or require the consumer to sign up for services to redeem the coupon. If so, BBB recommends using extreme restraint before sharing any personal information. Check out the company, free of charge, at bbb.org.

   

Preserving the Harvest: What do I do with all this produce?

By Edie McSherry/For The Johnstown Breeze

It’s that time of year when the fruits of your labor may be getting a little out of hand as ripened zucchini, tomatoes, cucumbers, apples and more wait to be picked.

Even if you don’t grow your own food, you can take advantage of a wide variety of high quality produce at local farmers’ markets and roadside stands. By preserving the produce in abundance now you can enjoy delicious, locally grown fruits and vegetables throughout the year.

The three main methods of preserving food are freezing, dehydrating and canning. Freezing is an excellent way to preserve the freshness, flavor, texture and nutrients of fruits and vegetables. Freezing slows down enzyme activity and retards growth of microorganisms. Most vegetables will need to be blanched – or briefly cooked – before freezing, to prevent loss of color, flavor and nutrients. The key to successful freezing is to always use airtight containers to prevent freezer burn. Freezing works well for fruits, some vegetables and herbs.

   

Many youngsters improperly restrained

By Edie McSherry/For The Johnstown Breeze

Now that students are back in school, most parents are getting back into the routine of the daily drive to school.

It’s time to educate parents on the importance of keeping their kids – especially 8-to-15-year-olds – safe in their vehicles. Child Passenger Safety Team Colorado is participating in National Child Passenger Safety Week this week and National Seat Check Saturday in a few days to help raise awareness about this serious issue.

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children ages 5 to 15, which means that child passenger safety not only applies to infants and toddlers, but also to tweens, who typically ditch the booster seat too early or sit in the front seat before they’re physically ready. Older children are more often improperly restrained than younger ones. Only 78 percent of 5 to 15 year olds were properly restrained, compared to nearly 93 percent of 0-to- 4-year-olds, in 2013.

   

 

39-14-Library
Breeze-writers-group38-41tf
Visitor Agreement/Privacy Policy
Comments are property of their posters, all other content copyright © 2002-2011 by Johnstown Breeze
Mailing address: P.O.Box 400, Johnstown, CO 80534 | Phone: 970-587-4525 | E-mail: editor@johnstownbreeze.com